Skip navigation.

Thematic Focus Areas

Welcome to this section where information covering our core thematic focus areas is grouped.


Related publications:

SAfAIDS Policy Brief: Lesotho Violence against Women and HIV: Upholding the Zero Agenda by moving towards a Protective Legal and Social environment for Women

As in other parts of southern Africa, the existence of a patriarchal society in Lesotho furthers gender inequality and normalises gender-based violence. This creates an unsafe environment for women that compromises HIV programming and is in fact, a direct departure from the zero agenda goal of ensuring zero new infections, zero AIDS-related deaths and zero discrimination by 2015. As this brief discusses, a protective legal and social environment is not just a possibility; it is a necessity. Without it, women will continue to be victimised and violated, with correspondingly dire implications for the HIV response. Without it, we risk undoing the gains made against HIV in Lesotho.

 

Click here to download SAfAIDS Policy Brief

National HIV Prevention Strategy For A Multi-Sectoral Response to the HIV Epidemic in Lesotho (2011/12-2015/16)

The National Multi-Sectoral HIV Prevention Strategy, 2011 – 2015, describes how the national HIV prevention response will reduce levels of HIV incidence by directly addressing the drivers of Lesotho’s epidemic. The 2009 Lesotho Demographic and Health Survey (LDHS) data indicate a rapid rise in HIV prevalence among young people, particularly young women. The total number of HIV-infected females aged 15-49 is 27%, but significantly lower at 18% for men the same age. By age 20-24, approximately 24% of women are infected; prevalence increases to 35% for the age cohort 25-29 and peaks at 42% for women throughout their thirties. Male prevalence lags behind female prevalence by about five years, but similarly reaches about 40% among men aged 30-45. With such high average levels of prevalence nationally, the pool of at-risk individuals is likely at or near saturation among adult men and women aged 25-44.

Malawi National HIV and AIDS Strategic Plan 2011-2016

 

The Malawi National  HIV and AIDS Strategic Plan (NSP 2011 – 2016) is a follow up of the National HIV and AIDS Action Framework (NAF 2005– 2009), which was extended to 2011. The NSP seeks to provide continued guidance to the national response to HIV and AIDS, building to work done in the past decade. It is informed by the findings of the Community and Stakeholder consultations the National HIV and AIDS Policy Review (March 2001), the Malawi Growth and Development strategy (2011 – 2016) and the Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSP) 2011– 2016; as well as developments in medical and scientific knowledge.

 

SAfAIDS Conducts orientation of Traditional Leaders on Early Access to ART for All

MBABANE, 3 October 2014 (SAfAIDS Media) - The Ministry of Health through the MaxART consortium is embarking on a new approach to HIV care in Swaziland. The approach is whereby antiretroviral treatment (ARVs) is offered to willing individuals after a positive HIV test, despite the level of their CD4 cell count, thereby including even those that still feel healthy and might not see the need for starting treatment. This approach still uses the same antiretroviral treatment (ARVs) that people living with HIV take for life and is known as Early Access to ART for All (EAAA).

Zimbabwe National HIV and AIDS Strategic Plan (ZNASP II) 2011 – 2015

The Zimbabwe National HIV and AIDS Strategic Plan (ZNASP) is a five-year 2011 to 2015, multi-sectoral framework developed to inform and guide the national response towards achieving zero new infections, zero discrimination and zero AIDS related deaths by 2015. The development of the plan is premised on human rights based planning approach that is complemented by evidence and results based management approaches.

Catalyzing Government Efforts to Reduce Child Mortality and Improve Maternal Health Services through Community Preparedness and Increased Advocacy Efforts in Zambia

SAfAIDS Zambia, with support from Save the Children, have just completed a successful 8-months project where the capacity of Community Based Volunteers (CBVs), policy makers, key stakeholders and parliamentarians was improved to better understand the importance of Maternal Child Health (MCH),  and be able to advocate for increased access to services (including SRHR and PMTCT). The project also successes in re-establishing mothers’ shelters for pregnant women in some of Zambia’s remotest villages.  

Syndicate content