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Southern Africa

Implementation of HIV prevention, treatment, care and support Conventions and Declarations in Swaziland and Zambia

This report highlights SAfAIDS’ findings on the implementation of regional and international HIV prevention, treatment, care and support conventions and declarations in Swaziland and Zambia. The assessment, which used qualitative methods to collect data on various HIV and AIDS services, used literature review and consultative meetings and key informant interviews with key stakeholders and focus group discussions with users of services and their representative organisations. SAfAIDS put together technical teams in the two countries comprised of an independent researcher, SAfAIDS staff and an in-country partner organisation identified to conduct the assessment.

Positive Transformation: Case Studies of Good Practice in HIV Interventions, SAfAIDS 2009

This document presents two case studies selected from some of SAfAIDS innovative work as a regional southern African organisation. In both case studies, it is evident that there is added value when a regional organisation works through strategic partnerships with governments and other key players in a country to implement innovative programmes; initially as pilots and then expanding and replicating in other countries. Very often, governments and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are so involved in fire-fighting in thier own countries, it compromises the time and opportunity to learn from other countries. Regional organisations that have a helicopter view of the region, are better placed to package the necessary information, learning experiences and to facilitate thier cross-sharing across countries. 

Protecting Africa’s future: Livelihood-based social protection for OVC in east and southern Africa

Protecting Africa’s future: Livelihood-based social protection for OVC in east and southern Africa, Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and SAfAIDS, 2009

Addressing TB and HIV more effectively in southern Africa: Policy Brief, SAfAIDS

TB, once thought to be a disease of the past or at the very least a disease restricted to poor countries, has re-emerged as the greatest threat to people living with HIV (PLHIV). It now threatens to reverse the huge gains made in the HIV and AIDS arena over the past 25 years. The HIV epidemic is reviving an old problem in well-resourced countries and greatly worsening an existing problem in resource-poor countries. One of the greatest challenges confronting service providers is that the best available treatments are of limited efficacy and are reaching only a small fraction of people who need them. Universal access to effective TB treatment is unachievable with current tools.

Mainstreaming Gender in the Response to HIV: Info Pack 2, COGENHA/SAfAIDS

Mainstreaming Gender in the Response to HIV: Info Pack 2, COGENHA/SAfAIDS, 2008

 

Infopack 2 outlines the basic concepts and issues related to gender, and offers practical hints for the effective integration of gender into policies and programmes. It discusses the importance of onsidering gender at all levels of HIV programme development, and highlights useful tools for mainstreaming gender in the design, implementation and evaluation of health and development nitiatives. Practical activities are outlined to assist readers to build their skills in the development of a gender policy to guide their organisation and its programmes.

Sub-Saharan Africa AIDS epidemic update Regional Summary: March 2008, UNAIDS/WHO

Sub-Saharan Africa AIDS epidemic update Regional Summary: March 2008, UNAIDS/WHO

 

The scale and trends of the epidemics in the region vary considerably, with southern Africa most affected.1 In 2007, this subregion accounted for almost a third (32%) of all new HIV infections nd AIDS-related deaths globally, with national adult HIV prevalence exceeding 15% in eight countries in 2005 (Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe). Nowhere else has national adult HIV prevalence reached such levels. However, there is evidence of slight eclines in the epidemics of some countries (notably Zimbabwe), while the epidemics in most of the rest of the subregion have either reached or are approaching a plateau (see Figure 1) Only in Mozambique have the latest HIV data (from 2005) shown an increase in prevalence over the revious surveillance data set.

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