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Prevention

STOP TB: Know The Facts

- Get as much information as you can about TB. With more information, a person can make the right choices and cope effectively with TB and HIV
- Ask your health care provider for more information on TB that you can read at home
- Find out if there are organisations within your community that deal with TB and other related diseases such as HIV
- Find out if there are support groups in your community and join them. This will improve your quality of life as you will be able to share information with people who have survived TB and HIV

Position Paper: A Regional Leadership Advocacy Movement for LGBTI Champions in Africa

Considering the roles that leaders play in society and their responsibility to represent all their constituents, it is critical that leaders advocate on behalf of the LGBTI members of society. Southern African countries have numerous organisations that represent the needs of LGBTI individuals, often under very challenging conditions. These organisations can be more effective if they have the support of political, traditional and religious leaders.

National Strategic Framework for HIV and AIDS Response in Namibia 2010/11 – 2015/16

The National Strategic Framework for HIV and AIDS (NSF) 2010/11 – 2015/16 defines how we as Namibians – all sectors of society at all levels – are going to respond to HIV and AIDS in the next six years. In developing a National HIV Strategic Framework (as opposed to another Medium Term Plan - MTP), Namibia has shifted the planning paradigm from focusing on service delivery only, to understanding how the service delivery efforts will lead to changes in the lives of the targeted audiences, and therefore impact on the epidemic itself. In so doing, Namibia has identified national priorities and articulated national targets (results) that all stakeholders will collectively contribute to. In this new strategy, we have mainstreamed gender and human rights in the implementation, and monitoring and  evaluation strategies.

Namibia National Strategy and Action Plan for the Elimination of new Paediatric HIV Infections and Keeping Their Mothers Alive 2012/13 - 2015/16

The eMTCT strategy runs four years from 2012/2013 and the final reporting period will be 2015/16. Indicators for monitoring the progress of the implementation of the eMTCT strategy are clearly defined and partners are obligated to monitor their pace of achievement using the agreed indicators depicted here. The success of this eMTCT strategy depends on the commitment of all line ministries, development partners, NGOs and communities investing in HIV prevention and care, maternal and neonatal health in the country.

SAfAIDS Policy Brief: Lesotho Violence against Women and HIV: Upholding the Zero Agenda by moving towards a Protective Legal and Social environment for Women

As in other parts of southern Africa, the existence of a patriarchal society in Lesotho furthers gender inequality and normalises gender-based violence. This creates an unsafe environment for women that compromises HIV programming and is in fact, a direct departure from the zero agenda goal of ensuring zero new infections, zero AIDS-related deaths and zero discrimination by 2015. As this brief discusses, a protective legal and social environment is not just a possibility; it is a necessity. Without it, women will continue to be victimised and violated, with correspondingly dire implications for the HIV response. Without it, we risk undoing the gains made against HIV in Lesotho.

 

Click here to download SAfAIDS Policy Brief

National HIV Prevention Strategy For A Multi-Sectoral Response to the HIV Epidemic in Lesotho (2011/12-2015/16)

The National Multi-Sectoral HIV Prevention Strategy, 2011 – 2015, describes how the national HIV prevention response will reduce levels of HIV incidence by directly addressing the drivers of Lesotho’s epidemic. The 2009 Lesotho Demographic and Health Survey (LDHS) data indicate a rapid rise in HIV prevalence among young people, particularly young women. The total number of HIV-infected females aged 15-49 is 27%, but significantly lower at 18% for men the same age. By age 20-24, approximately 24% of women are infected; prevalence increases to 35% for the age cohort 25-29 and peaks at 42% for women throughout their thirties. Male prevalence lags behind female prevalence by about five years, but similarly reaches about 40% among men aged 30-45. With such high average levels of prevalence nationally, the pool of at-risk individuals is likely at or near saturation among adult men and women aged 25-44.

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