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Mozambique National Strategic HIV and AIDS Response Plan 2010 – 2014

This document reflects a broad consensus, at several levels, on strategic approaches which will guide the response to HIV and AIDS in the 2010 to 2014 period. Its philosophy endorses a results]based approach, orientated by principles such as those of human rights, multisectoralism, systems strengthening, the economy of resources, and respect for socio]cultural dynamics which influence the behavior of Mozambican citizens.

South African National Strategic Plan on HIV, STIs and TB 2012 - 2016

The publication of the National Strategic Plan on HIV, Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Tuberculosis (TB) 2012 – 2016 marks a milestone in our nation’s response to the dual epidemics of HIV and TB. This five-year strategy reflects the progress we have made in achieving a clearer understanding of the challenges posed by these epidemics and the increasing unity of purpose among all the stakeholders, who are driven by a shared vision to attain the highest impact of our policies towards our long-term vision of zero new HIV and TB infections. Working together, over the past few years we have been able to register some marked progress in a number of critical areas in our response, such as a significant reduction in the vertical transmission of HIV and expanding access to a comprehensive package of HIV, STI and TB services.

Zambia National Strategic AIDS Framework 2011 – 2015: Towards Improving the Quality of life of the Zambian People

The National HIV/AIDS Strategic Framework (NASF) 2011-2015 constitutes a multi-sectoral, multi-layer and decentralised response to HIV and AIDS in Zambia. The Framework is designed to provide adequate space and opportunities for communities, civil society, private sector, development partners (bilateral and  multi-lateral agencies) and government institutions to actively participate in the implementation based on their mandate and comparative advantage

National Strategic Framework for HIV and AIDS Response in Namibia 2010/11 – 2015/16

The National Strategic Framework for HIV and AIDS (NSF) 2010/11 – 2015/16 defines how we as Namibians – all sectors of society at all levels – are going to respond to HIV and AIDS in the next six years. In developing a National HIV Strategic Framework (as opposed to another Medium Term Plan - MTP), Namibia has shifted the planning paradigm from focusing on service delivery only, to understanding how the service delivery efforts will lead to changes in the lives of the targeted audiences, and therefore impact on the epidemic itself. In so doing, Namibia has identified national priorities and articulated national targets (results) that all stakeholders will collectively contribute to. In this new strategy, we have mainstreamed gender and human rights in the implementation, and monitoring and  evaluation strategies.

The Second Botswana National Strategic Framework for HIV and AIDS 2010-2016

The purpose of this document is to outline the national priorities for the national response to HIV and AIDS for the period 2010 to 2016. These priorities are based on the evidence accumulated  locally and are augmented by international best practices. The overall philosophy behind the Second National Strategic Framework is one of prioritization, focus, and intensification. It is through collective and concentrated efforts around these priorities that we will be able to maximize the impact of the national response.

National HIV Prevention Strategy For A Multi-Sectoral Response to the HIV Epidemic in Lesotho (2011/12-2015/16)

The National Multi-Sectoral HIV Prevention Strategy, 2011 – 2015, describes how the national HIV prevention response will reduce levels of HIV incidence by directly addressing the drivers of Lesotho’s epidemic. The 2009 Lesotho Demographic and Health Survey (LDHS) data indicate a rapid rise in HIV prevalence among young people, particularly young women. The total number of HIV-infected females aged 15-49 is 27%, but significantly lower at 18% for men the same age. By age 20-24, approximately 24% of women are infected; prevalence increases to 35% for the age cohort 25-29 and peaks at 42% for women throughout their thirties. Male prevalence lags behind female prevalence by about five years, but similarly reaches about 40% among men aged 30-45. With such high average levels of prevalence nationally, the pool of at-risk individuals is likely at or near saturation among adult men and women aged 25-44.

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